I am exploring the connection with my environment that the 10,000 generations before me possessed. I believe that in this technological world we live in it is easy to loose sight of our reasons for being excited about life. I am no longer the Ducati riding, downtown loft living artist many know me or remember me as. Its not that I have fallen from any great height but I took on an inherent challenge to simply look in a mirror and justify the time I am spending in my waking life. Now, in my efforts in rebuilding myself into a human being that can best serve my environment I believe that I must develop a, one on one, relationship with nature that can sustain me and my family. By moving in this direction I hope to develop an understanding and independence that I believe will be crucial in laying the foundation on which to build "something" that can turn the direction I believe we, as a whole, are moving in. I believe that society, generally speaking, is finding its self in an unsustainable truth. What I have been made aware of in these past several years has led me to believe that through independent exploration and creative action one can find their own unique skill sets and reasons for moving towards an independent, sustainable, and rewarding life. I am set in proving it.


No bee is left out of the hive.





My online portfolio: www.KristoferLamey.com




1st April 2014

Photoset with 8 notes

We spotted a Rat Snake sun bathing in the forest today.  I typically do not handle snakes. I prefer they live without any further annoyance from the human world.  But, in this case, My children were eager to be formally introduced.  I took it as an opportunity to open them to understanding these beautiful creatures with hopes of inspiring them to respect nature and the environment we all share.  

It is unfortunate that many of these harmless snakes are often killed because they are mistaken for a venomous species. Not that killing a venomous type is justified… its just one of many examples of how ones lack of understanding of nature results in fear.  The action of cutting a snake in two is like the severing of ones connection to the earth.

If one is not in awe of the light our universe brings forth, then one is not yet in the light. If one steps into a dark room and flips on a switch, turning off the light will not erase the new found awareness.  If you are not passionate about nature yet than, at the least, don’t tread on it.

Please, don’t handle snakes you can not positively identify!

This Black rat snake was about 5 feet in length and found in Marietta, Georgia on 3.29.2014

Here is a link for more info:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rat_snake

Tagged: rat snakeblack snakesnakegeorgiaatlantasouthernSoutheasternnaturecampinghikingSurvivalPrepingprepsustainsustainabilitysustainableoff the gridhome school

2nd March 2014

Photoset with 517 notes

The children are getting better at making “lean-to” shelters. We picked a south facing slope, on a flat spot, on a hill that overlooks the forest and river below. On this project we help the children construct this “lean-to” a little differently. Instead of covering the shelter with leaves, we compressed the leaves in between all of the leaning sticks… Stuffing the leaves in by the handfuls, like insulation between studs in conventional home construction. In the end it’s an emergency shelter that will keep you warm and dry. It’s made in about half an hour with materials found on the ground all around you. If you’ve never tried to make a “Lean-to” shelter, we recommend it. It’s simple, fun, and almost therapeutic.

Tagged: lean to sheltershelterforrestsurvivalnaturenaturalsouthernprepprepperemergancycampinghikingsoutheasternatlantacomfortlosthomemadehome schoolchildrenoff the gridshtf

28th February 2014

Quote

One is only as serious as their questions.

25th February 2014

Photoset with 70 notes

We re-purposed an old stove and an old grill into a great smoker today. We cut away what was unnecessary from the old grill. Then added only a thermometer and made a handle out of the old wooden slats from the grill. If we ever needed to, we could take the grill portion off of the wood-burning stove. It’s only held on by two self tapping metal screws and its secure.

These photos are of our first attempt using the smoker. We smoked a chicken at 220° for four hours. We used natural oak charcoal and wet Cherry wood chips for the smoke. With minimal effort we were able to keep a consistent temperature and a good thick smoke. The wood-burning stove provided ample room for a good fire towards the front and in the back of the stove we put a metal coffee can to catch the drippings falling from the smoking meats above.

We are excited about uniting two unused forms found on our property to make the smoker we needed. Not only did it save us several hundred dollars but from my experience it really is a great smoker in many ways.


The chicken came out fantastic!

Tagged: recyclingrepurposesmokingbarbecuebbqbarbecue grillwood chipssmoked chickenimprovisedwoodstovewood-burning stovenaturalorganicnon-gmosustainablepreppingprepareoutdoorsbackyardsouthernSouth eastsoutheasterngreenshtfsmoked meatsgeorgiaatlanta

20th February 2014

Quote with 3 notes

The zoo is a great place to study people.

Tagged: zoosociologyatlantasocial behavior

17th February 2014

Photo with 13 notes

Our 10 year old Jeep. No power locks, power windows, or power seats… perfect.

2004 Jeep Rubicon.

Our 10 year old Jeep. No power locks, power windows, or power seats… perfect.

2004 Jeep Rubicon.

Tagged: jeepjeep rubicon4x4campingPrepingshtf2004 jeep rubicon

16th February 2014

Photoset with 6 notes

We stumbled upon a few good-looking “Sweet Tooth” mushrooms today… aka, Hedge Hog Mushroom, scientific name: “Hydnum Repandum” I must say, the taste is exquisite. We cooked them in just a little butter. The taste is close to that of an oyster. Cooking them slow made them so tender. I look forward to the day I find a good, basket filling, flush of these on the forest floor!

RESOURCES

If you or one you know would like to get to know this world more intimately I suggest two books. I have purchased, read, and sometimes returned books on this topic. The two books I am recommending are, so far, the ones I consider the essentials. These are the 2 books that accompany us into the field: 

1: “The National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms”  

ISBN: 978-0-394-51992-0

2: “Mushrooms Demystified” by David Arora

ISBN: 978-0-89815-169-5

GET READY

Mushroom Season is around the corner…Spring-Fall. Pick up a new study or hobby that makes your reason for going into the forest change over the years.

Tagged: foragingmushroomsatlantasouthernsoutheasternwildnaturalgeorgiasurvivalprepareprepperssweet tooth mushroomhedgehog mushroomnon gmoorganinchikingcampingsustainabilityindependantshtflovepeaceharmonyhydnum repandumnature

13th February 2014

Photoset with 71 notes

It’s windy and snowing outside. Inside, we make dutch oven biscuits.

Tagged: atlantaprepareoff the gridsustainabilitydutch ovensbiscuitssouthernfireplacecookingmother earth news

10th February 2014

Photoset with 126 notes

We started in the summer of 2013 with five rabbits, now it’s winter 2014 and we have 37 rabbits. We are now able to bring two rabbits a week to the dinner table! We use everything! In this example we smoked two rabbits, then we boil the bones and made a stock, we used the stock to make a stew and we save the hide to do several things. One example are the leggings we made our daughter for this winter.

Tagged: sustainabilityatlanta georgiasouthernsoutheasterncampingpreppingpreparehuntingoff the gridgreenrabbitsrabbitfarmingorganicnon-gmomonsantomother earth newshomeschoolrabbit meatrabbit-meatraising-rabbitsrabbit furrabbit farmfurnatural food

2nd February 2014

Photoset with 3 notes

Off of a dirt road just outside of Eastman, Georgia

Another amazing sunset spot in the Hunters paradise.

Tagged: southerngeorgiasoutheasternhuntingpreparecamping

16th January 2014

Photoset with 6 notes

SPORE PRINT

Identifying the Pleurotus Ostreatus. Commonly known as the “Oyster Mushroom”

By placing a sample of the mushroom cap on a white paper plate and covering it with a dish, one can determine the identity of a mushroom by the color of the spore print. By covering the sample one can insure a well defined print by blocking any moving air that may disturb the spores from falling directly onto the paper. Leave the dish on overnight and you should have a spore print to examine or study over breakfast.

SIMPLIFYING IT

The mushroom is a reproduction system. As the mushroom grows taller its cap begins to grow and open like an umbrella. Once open, the gills under the cap mature. The gills create the spore(s) that fall from the cap and are carried away by wind, water, or insect to, hopefully, deposit in an ideal environment… and the cycle continues.  This is a very generalized explanation. I find the details to be a fascinating story… an ongoing epic unfolding within nature. 

RESOURCES

If you or one you know would like to get to know this world more intimately I suggest two books. I have purchased, read, and sometimes returned books on this topic. The two books I am recommending are, so far, the ones I consider the essentials. These are the 2 books that accompany us into the field: 

1: “The National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms”  

ISBN: 978-0-394-51992-0

2: “Mushrooms Demystified” by David Arora

ISBN: 978-0-89815-169-5

GET READY

Mushroom Season is around the corner…Spring-Fall. Pick up a new study or hobby that makes your reason for going into the forest change over the years.

Tagged: mycologymushroomssurvivalcampingsporespore printsciencesouthernhuntinggatheringforaginghikingoutdoorsforestsustainabilityoff the gridnon gmo

16th January 2014

Photoset with 15 notes

What does one do when Oyster Mushrooms are discovered during a hike? Answer: Add them to your dinner.

RESOURCES

If you or one you know would like to get to know this world more intimately I suggest two books. I have purchased, read, and sometimes returned books on this topic. The two books I am recommending are, so far, the ones I consider the essentials. These are the 2 books that accompany us into the field: 

1: “The National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms”  

ISBN: 978-0-394-51992-0

2: “Mushrooms Demystified” by David Arora

ISBN: 978-0-89815-169-5

GET READY

Mushroom Season is around the corner…Spring-Fall. Pick up a new study or hobby that makes your reason for going into the forest change over the years.

Tagged: campinghuntingsouthernsoutheasternatlantageorgianorth georgiamycologymushroomsforagingsurvivalpreparebe preparedforesthikingbackpackingoutdoorshealthynaturalnatural foodnon gmosustainabilityoff the gridmother earth newshomeschool

22nd December 2013

Photoset with 9 notes

The Oyster Mushroom

From the forest to table…

I am teaching my son how to identify the Oyster mushroom. 

"Keep you eye open when hiking, flavorful experiences are everywhere."

Foraged on Dec 22, 2013 Atlanta, Ga.

Tagged: atlantageorgiamushroomsOyster MushroomsForestfoodgatheringhuntingforagingSurvivalPrepingcampingoutdoorscookinghomeschoolmother earth news

21st December 2013

Photoset with 30 notes

We found plenty “Pleurotus Ostreatus”, Oyster Mushroom in Fulton county, Ga. December 20th 2013

Oyster mushrooms belong to the genus Pleurotus. The common oyster mushroom widely available in supermarkets. However, all species of the genus are edible. If you have often purchased them, you will easily recognize them. They grow on dead snags or fallen trees, preferring deciduous species such as beech or poplar. They usually emerge from the side of the wood, forming overlapping shelves.

They have a firm but soft texture. A distinctive trait and key to identification is their decurrent gills, which means the gills run onto the stem, rather than stopping at the stem as in typical mushrooms. There is no ring or sac around the stem. The top of the cap has no warts or scales. The flesh is white, creamy or light brown.

Their delicate texture and flavour deserves special recognition in my opinion. Sauté them in a little butter, nothing else. I could eat a whole plate of them. Oyster mushrooms produce statins, which stimulate the liver to get rid of LDL cholesterol, so this delicacy is good for cardiovascular health.

Now that the #mushrooms are dry we will have that beautiful sweet woodsy flavor to add to any #recipe for months to come.

Tagged: mushroomsoyster mushroomssouthernsoutheasternprepperscampingforestforagingdryingpreservingatlantagatheringhuntingsurvival

11th December 2013

Photo with 8 notes

After the slow-carb diet and eating mostly the food I hunted, grown, and foraged myself. All the foods I eat now are all natural. I have also found out why eating like our grandparents did when we were their age costs twice as much.

After the slow-carb diet and eating mostly the food I hunted, grown, and foraged myself. All the foods I eat now are all natural. I have also found out why eating like our grandparents did when we were their age costs twice as much.

Tagged: slowcarbdietworkoutbefore and after