maypooletree said: Your blog is beautiful and all the things you do with your family is even better! Props to awesome parents :) Needless to say I aspire to bring my kids up with the same enthusiasm for learning new things :) Y'all deserved far more followers!

Thank you May!

I have never met a Canberran before. After doing some research I believe you live in a very interesting part of the world. Also, thank you very much for your message. It’s words such as yours that motivate is to share more.

Respectfully,

Kristofer

COOKING WITH ACORNS

Oct. 2014 Atlanta, Ga

We started off the taste experiment with a few pancakes. Just the average recipe with the introduction of our acorn flour. Egg, tea spoon of baking powder, and a pinch of salt. We were excited that it tasted great!! Also, we were relived to have the children rewarded for all their hard work with an end product that is tasty. They will always look at acorns differently now:-)

The taste: Nutty… a bit earthy because of the slight hint of tannin which makes it savory with a pinch of salt and butter. As I write this I want to make them again. It’s really surprising it could be so good! 


Follow this link to see our Acorn flour process:

http://southern4perspective.tumblr.com/post/99769960382/acorn-flour-october-2014-atlanta-georgia

ACORN FLOUR
October 2014
Atlanta, Georgia

Acorns can provide one with an exceptional nutritional value and have a tolerance for storage. This food source was a staple in the Native American diet. It is estimated that among one tribe, the Yokut, a typical family consumed 1,000 to 2,000 pounds of acorns each year! One analysis of uncooked acorn meal shows that it is 21% fat, 5% protein, 62% carbohydrate, and 14% water, mineral, and fiber.

The process is as follows:

- Gathering
- Cleaning
- Drying
- Peeling
- Grinding (course)
- Leaching the Tannins
- Squeezing out the water
- Drying
- Stone Grinding (fine)

It is not a quick or easy process. But discovering how essential it was to the Native Americans in the past and in our region we followed through with the best plan we could formulate to arrive to a top notch acorn flour.

We started with collecting about 7 lbs of large White Oak acorns making sure they were void of small holes and other defects. After collecting we put them into a bucket to wash them making sure to discard any acorns that float. Once cleaned we sun dried them for several days.
Once dry we crushed them with an arbor press to make the peeling easier. We placed the acorn meat into a blender and ground it into a course grind that was similar to consistency of coffee. We placed the ground acorn into glass bowls to began the leaching process.
Leaching the acorns took three days. By pouring cold water into the ground acorn and letting it sit the tannins that make the acorn bitter rise to the top that turns the water into a deep reddish brown color. Three times a day we pour out the dark water and refill it with new cold water. After three days the water cleared to the point where we could see the flour through the 1 1/2 inches of water before we poured it out and the flour did not taste bitter any longer. Once the tannin was leached we places the wet acorn grind into a thin cloth, gathers the acorn grind into a ball and twisted it tight until most of the water was removed. After repeating this step several times until all the acorn grind was squeezed out we were left with several acorn grind balls that resembled a plate of baseballs. We then placed and flatted the balls into our food dehydrator to remove the remaining water (this made our home smell like warm raisins… Awesome). Once dried we further process the acorn grind through our Wonder Mill grinder with the stone burrs in. Once done hand grinding we were left with a fine, stone ground acorn flour.

We hope our latest effort finds you inspired and adventuring into a deepening relationship with nature.

Visit Southern4perspective again soon. We are putting together our next post which will include what we make with out white acorn flour.

Links for further study:

- Acorn wiki link:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acorn

- A YouTube video. This is as close to the process we use as I could find:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QitkIGNwUgs&sns=em

- A quick read on the Native American’s relationship with the acorn: http://nativeamericannetroots.net/diary/1055

- If you just want to buy some I found this site: http://www.buyacornflour.com

Trametes versicolor
Common name: Turkey Tail Mushroom

We found a great flush this morning. It’s exactly what we were hunting for. We now have enough to make tea thru the winter. Score!!!

Ted talk about turkey tail:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pXHDoROh2hA&sns=em

Turkey tail mushroom wiki link:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trametes_versicolor

September 3rd 2014


I found an “Old man of the woods” mushroom under a large water oak.

This mushroom is edible despite its looks. Although, as it matures so does it’s edibility. Considering that this mushroom was in its prime I decided to take it into the kitchen.

Slicing it was a pleasure. It’s white flesh turned dark red then to brown in less than a minute. I sautéd the slices in butter with a pinch if salt. Cooked until some edges were crispy.

I always wondered how this mushroom tasted. Now I know. It may not play a star role in a dish but it could pull off best supporting character. The texture is great because the flesh is tender and then the deep tubular pores absorb the butter and give it a smooth feeling on the tongue.

If I stumbled across a good patch of these it could easily justify making a large pizza.

Found 10min drive north of Atlanta.

Some of our backyard honey.

We just had to take two frames out today.

Trametes versicolor

Common name: Turkey Tail Mushroom

This is a fresh specimen. Over the winter to early summer all that is typically found are old, not growing examples. From now till winter Trametes versicolor is out there growing. Some bands of color are a bit fuzzy, it’s almost 2mm thick, and it’s a polypore. There are several mushrooms that look similar, especially due to its color variation but the underside will be your conformation.

I made a tea with these. I just use a teaspoon of honey.

There are many health benefits. We have been buying these in pill form to add to our list of supplements. It’s not cheep so It feels good to the body, mind, and wallet to harvest this fresh ourselves.

Hello from Tokyo.

Octopus Sashimi.
One of the many reasons we like to visit Japan.

Octopus Sashimi.

One of the many reasons we like to visit Japan.

We found a “Purple Spored Puffball” on your walk this morning. A beautiful specimen without any bugginess. Personally, it’s my favorite mushroom to prepare. It’s like cutting into angel food cake. We just dust the cubes with flour, pepper, and a pinch of salt. We prefer to fry these in butter but I normally recommend an oil because it’s easy to burn the butter…. One has to keep a constant eye on it, but it is worth it!!

This mushroom is in the “choice edible” category and deserves it.  It’s flavor may not be as distinct as Sulfur shelf or Maitake but the puffball is subtly sweet and versatile. Its texture is like tofu and can be prepared as such.  You wont find this on the grocery store shelf because of how fast the mushroom begins to turn once cut. From the time we cut it from the ground to the time we prepared it for dinner about 12 hours elapsed and the pure white begin to form a slight tinge of beige. That is plenty of time for “field to table” cooking but not probable to consistently make it to a shelf for purchase. What we are getting at is, if you want to experience this… you have to be open to a little adventure, step outside the comfort zone, and learn something.  But PLEASE, be smart about it.

We hope this post finds you doing exactly what it is you need to do.

Respectfully,

K.


http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Mushrooms.Folder/Purple-Spored%20Puffball.html

It took us 3 minutes to start this fire with our solar lens. In our archive you can learn how to get one of these lenses…. Locally and probably free.

There is a point when cooking chanterelle when the water releases from the mushroom. Once this happens, usually 6min into cooking, drain most of the water then add your butter and seasoning. We have found this to be the best way to sauté them. This way the seasoning is not diluted by the water and you don’t over cook the mushroom by waiting for the water to reduce. 

Bon Appétit

Wiki info:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chanterelle


Nutrition facts:
http://www.nutritionvalue.org/Mushrooms%2C_raw%2C_Chanterelle_nutritional_value.html

The beautiful but deadly “Destroying Angle”.  I have seen several but none this big. The cap was almost 6” in diameter.

From WIki»>The destroying angel (Amanita bisporigera) and the death cap (Amanita phalloides) are responsible for the overwhelming majority of deaths due to mushroom poisoning. The toxin responsible for this is amatoxin. Symptoms do not appear for 5 to 24 hours, when the toxins may already be absorbed and the damage (destruction of liver and kidney tissues) irreversible…
Read more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Destroying_angel

The beautiful but deadly “Destroying Angle”.  I have seen several but none this big. The cap was almost 6” in diameter.

From WIki»>The destroying angel (Amanita bisporigera) and the death cap (Amanita phalloides) are responsible for the overwhelming majority of deaths due to mushroom poisoning. The toxin responsible for this is amatoxin. Symptoms do not appear for 5 to 24 hours, when the toxins may already be absorbed and the damage (destruction of liver and kidney tissues) irreversible…

Read more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Destroying_angel

Maitake aka, “Hen of the woods”

Latin name: “Grifola frondosa”

My wife picked up some fresh Maitake at “Far West Fungi” in San Francisco.
We sautéed them for a side with our shrimp and grits. The Maitake has a subtle nut flavor and when sautéed with just a little salted butter it’s wonderfully savory. If you are attempting to cook this mushroom for your first time remember…less is more. To much heat and butter could easily take away from the amazing texture all the leaflets provide.

Maitake: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grifola_frondosa

Far west fungi: http://www.ferrybuildingmarketplace.com/farwest_fungi.php

13 days old.

Our rabbit stock is a Flemish Giant & New Zealand mix.

13 days old.

Our rabbit stock is a Flemish Giant & New Zealand mix.